sound game instruction / easy to understand

Playing with this sound game is really quite easy. The buttons you see have been placed in a simple but meaningful order. We would have liked to have given the buttons nice descriptive names, but unfortunatly, we ran out of funds. None the less, if you have a fairly good memory, then I am sure there will be no confusion.
The first two buttons in the first row are responsible for loops. They start the sound when you touch them with the mouse. Don't click, just move the mouse onto the button, ok? If you want to turn the loop off, then touch the black switch on the respective button. The third button in the first row gives you some trombone slaps and clicks - a welcome rthymic aspect in the game.
The other buttons are responsible for shorter sounds of various lenths. They can be triggered in the same fashion - just touch the button with the mouse and off they go. You don't need to turn them off (in fact, you can't) and every time you touch the button the sound will be triggered. This means that you can layer the same sound on top of itself if you wish. Got it?
And now let's talk about the sounds each buttons makes: Well, the first button in the first row gives you a didgeridoo loop. The second button in the first row gives you a trombone"tatatata" pattern. The first button in the second row is a short dig grunt, the second button in the second row is a socalled trombone "biff-baff", the third button in the third - opps, sorry, I mean the second - row is a short conch shell call and the fourth button in the second row gives you a tuba climbing chordal cascade. So that's it for the second row. And now the third: The first button in the third row is a trombone "split-tone" - a type of multiphonic produced by changing the embochure tension -, the second button in the third row is a short version of the second button in the first row (the same thing - actually taken from Xenakis's KEREN) but without the loop. By touching the third button in the third row you hear a toot from the common garden hose. Now the fourth and last row: The first button is a passage taken from Scelsi's "Tre Pezzi" for trombone with a mute (in this case a "harmon"), from the second button there is a trombone "scream". Finally, the third button on the fourth and last row lets you hear a sucking trombone sound (that is a sound made by sucking air violently through the lips while they are connected to the trombone. - Just want to make that clear). So, like I said - it's easy!
With some practice, you will be able to put together nice little sound combinations. However, if you do indeed happen to have doubts about the quality of your results, well then, now you see that making music is maybe not as simple as I made you believe.

Back ´n play!